Council of Chalcedon (Ecumenical IV)…

…judges Francis’ idea on Jesus asking forgiveness from his parents

  • Our Lord Jesus Christ: the same perfect in divinity and perfect in humanity, like unto men in all things but sin

Following therefore the holy Fathers, we unanimously teach to confess one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, the same perfect in divinity and perfect in humanity, the same truly God and truly man composed of rational soul and body, the same one in being with us as to the humanity, like unto us in all things but sin […] (We confess that) one and the same Lord Jesus Christ the only begotten Son, must be acknowledged in two natures, without confusion or change, without division or separation. The distinction between the natures was never abolished by their union but rather the character proper to each on the two natures was preserved as they came together in one Person, but he is one and the same only begotten Son, God the Word, the Lord Jesus Christ, as formerly the prophets and later Jesus Christ himself have taught us about him and as has been handed down to us by the creed of the Fathers. (Denzinger-Hünermann 301-302. Council of Chalcedon, IV Ecumenical, Session V, The Chalcedonies Creed, October 22, 451)

…judges Francis’ idea on human suffering

  • Our Lord Jesus Christ, perfect in divinity and in humanity; like unto us in all things but sin

Following therefore the holy Fathers, we unanimously teach to confess one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, the same perfect in divinity and perfect in humanity, the same truly God and truly man composed of rational soul and body, the same one in being with the Father as to the divinity and one in being with us as to the humanity, like unto us in all things but sin. […] We confess that one and the same Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son, must be acknowledged in two natures, without confusion or change, without division or separation. The distinction between the natures was never abolished by their union but rather the character proper to each of the two natures was preserved as they came together in one Person and one hypostasis. He is not split or divided into two Person, but he is one and the same only begotten Son, God the Word, the Lord Jesus Christ, as formerly the prophets and later Jesus Christ himself have taught us about him and as has been handed down to us by the creed of the Fathers. (Denzinger-Hünermann 301-302. Council of Chalcedon (Fourth Ecumenical), Session V, The Chalcedonian Creed, October 22, 451)