Catechism of Saint Pius X…

…judges Francis’ idea that it is no longer necessary to declare one’s sins to a confessor to be pardoned

  • Confession is called an accusation, because it must be a true and sorrowful manifestation of our sins

Q: Why is this sacrament also called Confession?
A: This sacrament is also called Confession, because to obtain pardon for sins it is not enough to detest them, but it is necessary also to accuse oneself of them to the priest, that is, to make a confession of them.
Q: What is the matter of the sacrament of Penance?
A: The matter of the sacrament of Penance is divided into remote and proximate. The remote matter consists of the sins committed by the penitent after Baptism; and the proximate matter are the acts of the penitent himself, that is, contrition, confession and satisfaction.
Q: In what does confession of sins consist?
A: Confession of sins consists in a distinct accusation of our sins made to the confessor in order to obtain absolution and receive penance for them.
Q: Why is confession called an accusation?
A: Confession is called an accusation, because it must not be a careless recital, but a true and sorrowful manifestation of our sins. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, no. 3.6.14-15)

  • Our confession ought to be entire and sincere

Q: Which are the qualities the accusation of sins, or confession, ought to have?
A: The principal qualities which the accusation of our sins ought to have are five: It ought to be humble, entire, sincere, prudent and brief. […]
Q: What is meant by saying that the accusation ought to be entire?
A: That the accusation ought to be entire means that all mortal sins we are conscious of having committed since our last good confession must be made known, together with the circumstances and number. […]
Q: What is meant by saying that the accusation ought to be sincere?
A: By saying that the accusation ought to be sincere, is meant that we must unfold our sins as they are, without excusing them, lessening them, or increasing them. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, no. 73.75.87)

  • We are bound to confess all our mortal sins in order to get absolution

Q: Having prepared properly for confession by an examination of conscience, by exciting sorrow, and by forming a good resolution, what do you do next?
A: Having prepared properly for confession by an examination of conscience, by sorrow, and by a purpose of amendment, I will go to make an accusation of my sins to the confessor in order to get absolution.
Q: What sins are we bound to confess?
A: We are bound to confess all our mortal sins; it is well, however, to confess our venial sins also. […]
Q: If a mortal sin, forgotten in confession, is afterwards remembered, are we bound to confess it in another confession?
A: If a mortal sin forgotten in confession is afterwards remembered we are certainly bound to confess it the next time we go to confession. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, no. 71-72.83)

  • He who, through shame or some other motive, willfully conceals a mortal sin in confession, profanes the sacrament and is consequently guilty of a very great sacrilege

Q: What does he commit who, through shame or some other motive, willfully conceals a mortal sin in confession?
A: He who, through shame or some other motive, willfully conceals a mortal sin in confession, profanes the sacrament and is consequently guilty of a very great sacrilege.
Q: In what way must he relieve his conscience who has willfully concealed a mortal sin in confession?
A: He who has willfully concealed a mortal sin in confession, must reveal to his confessor the sin concealed, say in how many confessions he has concealed it, and make all these confessions over again, from the last good confession. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, no. 84-85)

  • What reflection should a penitent make if tempted to conceal a sin in confession?

Q: What reflection should a penitent make who is tempted to conceal a sin in confession?
A: He who is tempted to conceal a mortal sin in confession should reflect: (1) That he was not ashamed to sin, in the presence of God who sees all; (2) That it is better to manifest his sin secretly to the confessor than to live tormented by sin, die an unhappy death, and be covered with shame before the whole world on the day of general judgment; (3) That the confessor is bound by the seal of confession under the gravest sin and under threat of the severest punishments both temporal and eternal. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, no. 86)

…judges Francis’ idea that Christ was stained by sin

  • Christ’s suffering should inspire us with the deepest horror of sin

Was it necessary for Jesus Christ to suffer as much as He actually did?
No, it was not absolutely necessary for Jesus Christ to suffer as much as He did, because each of His acts being of infinite value, the least of His sufferings would have sufficed for our redemption.
Why, then, did Jesus suffer so much?
Jesus Christ suffered so much in order to satisfy divine justice all the more abundantly; to display His love for us still more; and to inspire us with the deepest horror of sin. (Catechism of Saint Pius X. The fourth article of the Creed, no. 12–13)

…judges Francis’ idea on the Church’s fault for the Anglican schism

  • A Catholic should not even accept a Protestant Bible

What should a Christian do who has been given a Bible by a Protestant or by an agent of the Protestants?
A Christian to whom a Bible has been offered by a Protestant or an agent of the Protestants should reject it with disgust, because it is forbidden by the Church. If it was accepted by inadvertence, it must be burnt as soon as possible or handed in to the Parish Priest.

Why does the Church forbid Protestant Bibles?
The Church forbids Protestant Bibles because, either they have been altered and contain errors, or not having her approbation and footnotes explaining the obscure meanings, they may be harmful to the Faith. It is for that same reason that the Church even forbids translations of the Holy Scriptures already approved by her which have been reprinted without the footnotes approved by her. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, On Holy Scripture, 32–33)

…judges Francis’ idea on Grace

  • Grace is an inward and supernatural gift

What is grace?
Grace is an inward and supernatural gift given to us without any merit of our own, but through the merits of Jesus Christ in order to gain eternal life. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Sacraments, no. 10)

  • Grace is divided into sanctifying grace and actual grace

How is grace distinguished?
Grace is divided into sanctifying grace, which is also called habitual grace, and actual grace.
What is sanctifying grace?
Sanctifying grace is a supernatural gift inherent in our soul, and rendering us just, adopted children of God and heirs to Paradise. […]
What is actual grace?
Actual grace is a supernatural gift which enlightens the mind, moves and strengthens the will in order to enable us to do good and avoid evil.
(Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Sacraments, no. 11 12, 16)

…judges Francis’ idea on the poor being the heart of the Gospel

  • To have a heart detached from riches is to be poor in spirit

Who are the poor in spirit whom Jesus Christ calls blessed?
The poor in spirit are, according to the gospel, those whose hearts are detached from riches; who make good use of riches should they have any; who do not seek them too eagerly, if they have none; and who suffer the loss of such things with resignation when deprived of them. (Catechism of Saint Pius X. The Beatitudes, no. 4)

…judges Francis’ idea that spiritual direction is a charism of the laity

  • Christ himself established the distinction within the Church of those who teach and those who are taught

Is there any distinction between the members of the Church?
There is a very notable distinction between the members of the Church; for there are some who rule and some who obey; some who teach and some who are taught.
What do you call that part of the Church which teaches?
That part of the Church which teaches is called the Teaching Church.
What do you call that part of the Church which is taught?
That part of the Church which is taught is called the Learning Church, or the Church Taught.
Who has set up this distinction in the Church?
Jesus Christ Himself has established this distinction in the Church.
[…]
And the Church Taught, of whom is it composed?
The Church Taught is composed of all the faithful.
Who, then, are they who possess the teaching power in the Church?
The teaching power in the Church is possessed by the Pope and the Bishops, and, dependent on them, by the other sacred ministers. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The ninth article of the Creed, no. 38-41. 44-45)

…judges Francis’ idea that Christians and Muslims share the same faith

  • God is the Father of all men

Why do we call God the Father?
We call God the Father because by nature He is the Father of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity, that is to say, of the Son begotten of Him; because God is the Father of all men, whom He has created and whom He preserves and governs; finally, because by grace He is the Father of all good Christians, who are hence called the adopted sons of God. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, no. 3, The first article of the Creed)

…judges Francis’ idea on anticlericalism

  • Two-fold power: over Christ’s real Body, and over His mystical body

The dignity of the Christian Priesthood is great indeed, because of the two-fold power which Jesus Christ has conferred upon it — that over His real body and that over His mystical body, or the Church; and because of the divine mission committed to priests to lead men to eternal life. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Sacrament of Holy Orders, no. 6)

…judges Francis’ idea on asking prayers from non-catholics and atheists

  • Prayers have efficacy when one asks in the Name of Jesus Christ

In whose name should we ask of God the graces we stand in need of?
We should ask of God the graces we stand in need of in the Name of Jesus Christ, as He Himself has taught us and as is done by the Church, which always ends her prayers with these words: Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
Why should we beg graces of God in the Name of Jesus Christ?
We should beg graces of God in the Name of Jesus Christ because He is our Mediator, and it is through Him alone that we can approach the throne of God. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, Prayer in General, no. 8-9)

  • Those who are outside the true Church are excluded from perfect communion in spiritual goods

Do all the children of the Church share in this communion of goods?
All Christians who are in the grace of God share in the communion of internal goods, while those who are in mortal sin do not participate in these goods.
Why do not those who are in mortal sin participate in these goods?
Because that which unites the faithful with God, and with Jesus Christ as His living members, rendering them capable of performing meritorious works for life eternal, is the grace of God which is the supernatural life of the soul; and hence as those who are in mortal sin are without the grace of God, they are excluded from perfect communion in spiritual goods, nor can they accomplish works meritorious towards life eternal. […]
Who are they who do not belong to the Communion of Saints?
Those who are damned do not belong to the Communion of Saints in the other life; and in this life those who belong neither to the body nor to the soul of the Church, that is, those who are in mortal sin, and who are outside the true Church.
Who are they who are outside the true Church?
A. Outside the true Church are: Infidels, Jews, heretics, apostates, schismatics, and the excommunicated. (Catechism of Saint Pius X. no. 4-5.10-11)

  • We must be in the state of grace to render our prayers efficacious

What is the first and best disposition to render our prayers efficacious?
The first and best disposition to render our prayers efficacious is to be in the state of grace; or if we are not in that state, to desire to put ourselves in it. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, Prayer, no. 14)

…judges Francis’ idea on capital punishment

  • It is lawful to kill when carrying out a sentence of death in punishment of a crime

Q: Are there cases in which it is lawful to kill?
A: It is lawful to kill when fighting in a just war; when carrying out by order of the Supreme Authority a sentence of death in punishment of a crime; and, finally, in cases of necessary and lawful defense of one’s own life against an unjust aggressor. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Fifth Commandment, Question 3Spanish)

…judges Francis’ idea on a horizontal Church

  • Jesus Christ Himself has established the hierarchy in the Church

Q. Is there any distinction between the members of the Church?
A. There is a very notable distinction between the members of the Church; for there are some who rule and some who obey; some who teach and some who are taught. […]
Q. Who has set up this distinction in the Church?
Jesus Christ Himself has established this distinction in the Church. (Pius X. Catechism, Apostles Creed, Article IX, no. 38-41)

  • The power possessed by the Hierarchy comes solely from God

Does the power possessed by the members of the Hierarchy come from the people?
The power possessed by the Hierarchy does not come from the people, and it would be heresy to say it did: it comes solely from God. (Pius X. Catechism, Apostles Creed, Article IX, no. 48)

…judges Francis’ vision on the divorced who re-marry

  • Spouses who live together united by only a civil marriage live in a habitual state of mortal sin

Is it sufficient for a Christian to get only the civil marriage or contract?
For a Christian, it is not sufficient to get only the civil contract, because it is not a sacrament, and therefore not a true marriage.
In what condition would the spouses be who would live together united only by a civil marriage?
Spouses who would live together united by only a civil marriage would be in an habitual state of mortal sin, and their union would always be illegitimate in the sight of God and of the Church. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Sacrament of Marriage, no. 24-25)

  • Mortal sin turns one into a dead member of the Church

Who are the living members of the Church?
The living members of the Church are the just, and the just alone, that is, those who are actually in the grace of God.
And who are the dead members?
The dead members of the Church are the faithful in mortal sin. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, Ninth Article, no. 25-26)

  • Those who are in mortal sin are without the grace of God and excluded from perfect communion in spiritual goods

Do all the children of the Church share in this communion of goods?
All Christians who are in the grace of God share in the communion of internal goods, while those who are in mortal sin do not participate in these goods.
Why do not those who are in mortal sin participate in these goods?
Because that which unites the faithful with God, and with Jesus Christ as His living members, rendering them capable of performing meritorious works for life eternal, is the grace of God which is the supernatural life of the soul; and hence as those who are in mortal sin are without the grace of God, they are excluded from perfect communion in spiritual goods, nor can they accomplish works meritorious towards life eternal. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Communion of Saints, no. 4-5)

  • Those who are in mortal sin are without the grace of God and excluded from perfect communion in spiritual goods

Do all the children of the Church share in this communion of goods?
All Christians who are in the grace of God share in the communion of internal goods, while those who are in mortal sin do not participate in these goods.
Why do not those who are in mortal sin participate in these goods?
Because that which unites the faithful with God, and with Jesus Christ as His living members, rendering them capable of performing meritorious works for life eternal, is the grace of God which is the supernatural life of the soul; and hence as those who are in mortal sin are without the grace of God, they are excluded from perfect communion in spiritual goods, nor can they accomplish works meritorious towards life eternal. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Communion of Saints, no. 4-5)

  • The efficacy of prayer depends on the state of grace

What is the first and best disposition to render our prayers efficacious?
The first and best disposition to render our prayers efficacious is to be in the state of grace; or if we are not in that state, to desire to put ourselves in it. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, Prayer, no. 14)

  • The good physician uses disagreeable remedies to save the life of his patients

Is not a confessor too severe, who defers absolution because he does not believe the penitent is well enough disposed?
A confessor who defers absolution because he does not believe the penitent well enough disposed, is not too severe; on the contrary, he is very charitable and acts as a good physician who tries all remedies, even those that are disagreeable and painful, to save the life of his patient. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, The Sacrament of Penance, no. 102)

…judges Francis’ idea comparing Catechesis with Yoga and Zen

  • Catechesis: We receive the doctrine that Jesus Christ taught and committed to his Apostles from the Holy Catholic Church

What is Christian Doctrine?
Christian doctrine is the doctrine which Jesus Christ our Lord taught us to show us the way of salvation.
Is it necessary to learn the doctrine taught by Jesus Christ?
It certainly is necessary to learn the doctrine taught by Jesus Christ, and those who fail to do so are guilty of a grave breach of duty.
Are parents and guardians bound to send their children and those dependent on them to catechism?
Parents and guardians are bound to see that their children And dependents learn Christian Doctrine, and they are guilty before God if they neglect this duty.
From whom are we to receive and learn Christian Doctrine?
We are to receive and learn Christian Doctrine from the Holy Catholic Church.
How are we certain that the Christian Doctrine which we receive from the Holy Catholic Church is really true?
We are certain that the doctrine which we receive from the Holy Catholic Church is true, because Jesus Christ, the divine Author of this doctrine, committed it through His Apostles to the Church, which He founded and made the infallible teacher of all men, promising her His divine assistance until the end of time. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, no. 4-8)

…judges Francis’ idea on divorcees as Godparents

  • Catholics of good life, and obedient to the laws of the Church should be chosen as godfathers and godmothers

Who are the godfathers and godmothers in Baptism?
The godfathers and godmothers in Baptism are those persons who, in accordance with the decree of the Church, hold the infants at the font, answer for them, and become guarantees in the sight of God for their Christian education, especially in the absence of the parents.

What sort of persons should be chosen as godfathers and godmothers?
There should be chosen as godfathers and godmothers Catholics of good life, and obedient to the laws of the Church.

What are the obligations of godfathers and godmothers?
Godfathers and godmothers are bound to see that their spiritual children are instructed in the truths of faith, and live as good Christians and they should edify them by their good example. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, Baptism, nos. 22.24-25)

…judges Francis’ ideas present in Laudate Si

  • We should beg graces of God in the Name of Jesus Christ because He is our Mediator, and it is through Him alone that we can approach the throne of God

What is public prayer?

Public prayer is that said by the Sacred Ministers in the name of the Church and for the salvation of the faithful. That prayer also which is said in common and publicly by the faithful, in processions, pilgrimages and in God’s house, may also be called public prayer.

Have we a well-founded hope of obtaining by means of prayer the helps and graces of which we stand in need?

The hope of obtaining from God the graces of which we stand in need is founded on the promises of the omnipotent, merciful and all-faithful God, and on the merits of Jesus Christ.

In whose name should we ask of God the graces we stand in need of?

We should ask of God the graces we stand in need of in the Name of Jesus Christ, as He Himself has taught us and as is done by the Church, which always ends her prayers with these words: Through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Why should we beg graces of God in the Name of Jesus Christ?

We should beg graces of God in the Name of Jesus Christ because He is our Mediator, and it is through Him alone that we can approach the throne of God. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, Prayer, Qu. 6-9)

…judges Francis’ idea on sin and mercy

  • Jesus suffered to satisfy divine justice and to inspire the deepest horror for sin

No, it was not absolutely necessary for Jesus Christ to suffer as much as He did, because each of His acts being of infinite value, the least of His sufferings would have sufficed for our redemption. Jesus Christ suffered so much in order to satisfy divine justice all the more abundantly; to display His love for us still more; and to inspire us with the deepest horror of sin. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, nos. 12, 13)

  • What should you do to excite yourself to detest your sins? Consider the rigor God’s justice and the foulness of sin

To excite myself to detest my sins: (1) I will consider the rigour of the infinite justice of God And the foulness of sin which has defiled my soul and made me worthy of the eternal punishment of hell; (2) I will consider that by sin I have lost the grace, friendship and sonship of God and the inheritance of Heaven; (3) That I have offended my Redeemer who died for me And that my sins caused His death; (4) That I have despised my Creator and my God, that I have turned my back upon Him who is my Supreme Good and worthy of being loved above everything else And of being faithfully served. (Catechism of saint Pius X, no. 54)

…judges Francis’ idea on First Holy Communion

  • Marvelous conversion of bread and wine into the Body of Jesus Christ

The Eucharist is a Sacrament in which, by the marvelous conversion of the whole substance of bread into the Body of Jesus Christ, and that of wine into His precious Blood, is contained truly, really, and substantially, the Body, the Blood, the Soul and Divinity of the same Lord Jesus Christ, under the appearance of bread and wine as our spiritual food. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, ch. IV, no. 598)

…judges Francis’ idea on Catholic Education to the Youth

  • Parents who do not teach their children Catholic doctrine sin gravely

Is it necessary to learn the doctrine taught by Jesus Christ?
It certainly is necessary to learn the doctrine taught by Jesus Christ, and those who fail to do so are guilty of a grave breach of duty.
Are parents and guardians bound to send their children and those dependent on them to catechism?
Parents and guardians are bound to see that their children and dependents learn Christian Doctrine, and they are guilty before God if they neglect this duty. (Catechism of St. Pius X)

…judges Francis’ idea on happiness

  • Our greatest good is a pure conscience

A Christian can be content in a state of poverty by reflecting that our greatest good is a pure and peaceful conscience; that our true home is heaven; and that Jesus Christ made Himself poor for love of us and has promised a special reward to those who bear poverty patiently. (Catechism of Saint Pius X, Tenth Commandment – q.4)

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